, The Green Pennies Stock Report: 08/07/17

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Monday, August 7, 2017

A More Personal Introduction (Part 2)

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Okay so, I learned my lesson with the larger stocks. When looking at my intentions with making this trade, I found that I actually was somewhat aggressive with my trading style. At that time, I was all big risk, big reward. So I want to get rich with my $400 dollars (now about $380), how will I do it? Well, there is a form of stock out there that is known for being high risk/high reward, and its name is the penny stock. 

It was around this time that I learned how to scan for stocks with TDAmeritrade's thinkorswim trading platform as well as talking with other investors (and honestly learned a lot from them) through Ihub (google >> IHub). I found another stock that showed a lot of promise at the time and seemed like an excellent deal. I bought into the stock and managed to make $100 after commissions after the trade. This was the first time I made my own money, and it wasn't like my first dollar or anything, it was my first $100. I was simply ecstatic that I've found a way to make money on my own (that honestly works)!

With this being said though, my story with that stock isn't really over. I was lucky as when I sold, I was able to sell at the stocks peek. From there, the stock pretty much slowly went down and down (and is still going down even today). The company was hyping up the idea that they were developing a brand new type of credit card that hackers simply wouldn't be able to hack/crack/steal. The problem was that on their balance sheet (provided by OTCMarkets), it showed that they were using investors funds from their IPO (initial public offering) to develop these new cards. As an investor (even then), I wouldn't feel comfortable until they actually started to bring in profits. As the hope that we'd see the day that they started making money dwindled, so did the share price. I pretty sure that this stock is a pump and dump although it's totally possible they were developing this product and simply keep throwing money at it. Will they actually release a worth while product? Who knows??? 

With that stock behind me, I learned more about pump and dumps as well as how to avoid them (aka look at the quarterly/annual reports, investors opinions, and news). Then the day came that I found the stock that will simply make me rich! The stock price was low, the company is making revenue, and has a month over month improvement in revenue such that the company would become profitable overall. They also were paying off their debt at the time (which they did). I read all this, did all the research, talked to all the investors in the forums (and got really acquainted there), and was ready to buy the stock.

I bought in with as much money as I could back then (still roughly about $400; I saved the $100 as a trophy) and bought in. The thing about penny stocks is that there can be some pretty crazy (and volatile) when new news comes about. It's because of this that I really struck gold for the first time. 

I was on break, and as usual, I'd use my phone to check the stock price. What I saw surprised the living heck out of me. The stock price rose by a factor of 10!!! That $400 dollars just became $4000. I quickly sold as to solidify my gains. I remember calling my friends and family telling them what happened and honestly freaking out. The feeling of winning the lottery honestly washed over me!

I learned two things from this. When the stock price jumped up and I sold, the next day the stock price plummeted. This has been an honest to god "golden rule" for me for the longest time. To the many people that I've taught how to invest, I made sure they all know my rule of, "What goes up must come down." If the stock price is constant and then has a big move, the move will often times correct itself. The only time this wouldn't be true was if the news was either that great or really awful (lost a lawsuit, trials of a new cancer drug failed, etc.). 

The second thing I learned is that while you started with little money, there are definitely (if not always going to be) people with big hands and tons of money willing to throw at a stock. This is where I learned that you have to be clever. You can watch the bid and the ask and find the perfect time to strike to either get the price to move the way you want it to, or to sell at the best price possible. You can use Ihub to change popular opinion about that stock as well. If you hype the stock up, I've always had positive results from doing so. Some investors (mainly MM's) bash stocks to try to get the price lower so they can get more shares at the same price (more band for their buck).

Me being the crazy daredevil I was saw a great future in the company and patiently bought in and waited for the stock price to rise yet again. While it took about 3-5 months for this to happen, I got a times 7-8 return on my investment. I had about $25,000 - $30,000 in my account at that time. As time went on I had to take money out to pay off some college stuff as well as living expenses. Today, I have about $16,000 of that money left, though I'm currently patiently waiting for my next move to strike. I personally think I'll be rich in the next few years, but I won't know until I get there. 


Did you learn anything from this? Did you find this story motivational? 
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A More Personal Introduction (Part I)

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As you know, my name is Richard Musgrave. You already know that I love investing as well as business, but there's plenty of other things worth telling you about as well. There's a lot more information on its way so I feel that it'd be a great idea to tell you a little about myself and how I got into investing. 

Thanks to my parents, I never really had that much of a desire to look into investing. They'd tell me stories about how family members lost a lot of money and that it'd be best to stay away. Even with this being said though, I've always been very curious about that markets and the reasoning (or lack there of) with which they moved. After finding a more steady job and saving a decent amount of money, I suddenly had this drive to be self-employed. I started working at the age of 16, and I didn't mind it that much up until then, but ever since that day, I've disliked going to work. 

With this new found entrepreneurial drive, I started looking for alternate ways to make money. I started learning how to start my own computer repair business (which just recently became a reality). I started learning how to read (and make) revenue statements and balance sheets. This was honestly a period where I hunkered down and learned as much about business as possible not only because it was something I wanted to do, but because I loved doing it. 

While I was researching all of this, I stumbled upon investing. I think it might have a been a few videos on Youtube as well as a recent stock market crash that peeked my interest enough to start learning about it. It was simply fascinating to me. Billions and billions of dollars being traded between people. The coolest part simply was the fact that with services like TDAmeritrade and Robinhood, ordinary people like you and me can be a piece of the pie. We didn't have to spend tons and tons of money just to put our foot in the door for the chance to make money. It was simply empowering to learn about all this stuff. In fact, as time went on, I found myself studying more about how to make trades in the stock market than with getting my business setup. 

Then that fateful day came. Today was going to be the day that I'd start my journey to investing. This was the beginning of the path where I'd make tons of money and never have to work slaving away for an employer that doesn't care about me. This was the day that I'd starting fighting for myself. Again, it was a truly empowering moment for me. I filled out the application for TDAmeritrade, I transferred in about $400 dollars (my bi-weekly paycheck at the time) into their account, and I was ready to go.

Now I had a big problem that I was going to have to solve. What stock would I put my money in?  I looked around (without many of the tools I've posted in my previous posts) and found a "stock" that I was sure was going to make me some money. Looking back on this trade, it was a bad trade. Yet, I could never be mad at myself for making such a trade so early on in the game. It turned out that I bought into a hedge fund (I can't really remember). The idea simply is that this "stock" was actually affected by many other stocks. The idea is that you give your money to the head fund managed and you buy "stock" from them. The price of this stock is affected by many of the other stocks that the company is buying into. In my case, the company had bought up a ton of oil stocks.

The stock price was about $35 per share when I bought in. A week passed, and nothing actually happened, so I got bored and pulled my money out. This turned out to be a great decision as about a year after that, the oil market crashed. This taught me a valuable lesson. The higher the stock price is and the less its moved around in the past (volatility), the less likely I'm going to make any significant money from the trade. 

I also learned that I get hit with a commission for every buy and sell order I processed. Leading up to the trade, I was honestly confused at how TDAmeritrade actually handled commissions. I can tell you now that if you buy a stock and then sell the stock, you have two trades and will have to pay about $20 in commissions. 


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Tools for Finding/Investigating Stocks

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The best for me to describe the tools that I use to both find and investigate the many stocks out there is to simply tell you my process for picking stocks. First, I use a handy feature on TD Ameritrade's online platform called thinkorswim (desktop version). You should see a tab called “Scan.” This tab allows you to add filters so that you can find stocks that fit the criteria that you’re searching for. Another option worth talking about is Stock Screener from Yahoo Finance. This does virtually the same thing, though I personally don’t find the interface that tidy. 

All companies that are being publically traded have what’s called a ticker symbol. Examples of ticker symbols are AAPL (Apple), GOOG (Google), and MFST (Microsoft). When using a scanner, you’ll receive a list of ticker symbols as well as information about how the stock is being traded. I might compile a list of about 15 stocks (their ticker symbols) that I’m interested and then go to IHUB (or InvestorHUB, investorshub.advfn.com). IHUB has many forum boards for stocks that you can use to test the validity of the company as well as read other investors discussions. This can be a handy tool to see if the company is worth buying into. For example, let’s say you have company XYZ. You go to Ihub, search for XYZ, and find a message board for XYZ.

              If the last comments on the board are even a few days old with little activity, I’ll throw the stock to the waste side. Reason being, I like to see companies that have an Ihub board that is very active. This tells me that there’s interest here and that it might be worth my time. When you open the forum page, you’ll see a company synopsis that the moderators for the board made. This can give you information as to what kind of business is doing, how the companies financials are, as well as what products they offer. This synopsis is also helpful in that it can tell you if there are pump and dump alerts (or any alerts or warnings for the company). If I see any alerts of warnings on the synopsis page, I automatically throw the company out. I don’t want to risk my money in a possible scam. 

              At the very bottom of the page, you’ll find the actual form itself. This is where I can start reading how investors feel about the company. Are they looking forward to any new news coming out? Are they excited about the company? Do they think the business is sinking? The kinds of opinions can give me a good place to start my research on the company. When doing this, you also have to be wary of any fear mongers that you might come across. Most forums have someone that will act like the stock is a sinking ship and tell everyone to sell their shares. I’ve seen people where business is outstanding, and they still make a scene. Just be aware that these people exist and that you’ll likely have to put up with a lot of them in the future. Also, if public opinion of the majority of the forum is overwhelmingly negative, I feel it is best to stay away from the stock.

              Once I’ve narrowed my list down this far, I’d want to check the financials. I personally want to invest in stocks that are either making a profit or are really close to it (with increasing revenue month over month). To do this, we need to go to either the NASDAQ or OTCMarkets. The NASDAQ is the premier market for stocks to be traded on. There are some fairly strict regulations that publicly trading companies have to meet before they can use this platform to trade. The easiest and most general way to talk about the Nasdaq is that it’s the platform that larger corporations use to trade on. 

              The OTCMarkets is similar to the NASDAQ as it’s a place for the companies that don’t meet NASDAQ’s requirement to trade on. Most of the stocks that you’ll see on the OTCMarkets are commonly called penny stocks as many of the stocks are traded under one dollar per share. The reason why I bring these two platforms up is because of how you can obtain the most recent financials and business information. Go to Nasdaq.com, enter the ticker symbol, and then click SEC Filings to get to the financials. Go to otcmarkets.com, enter the ticker symbol, then “Filings and Disclosers” to get these financial documents. Sometimes these financial reports have codenames. The file named 10-q is the quarterly report, and there’s one for the annual report as well (OTCMarkets is currently making it easier to find this information). 

              Once we have this opened, we will see information on how much money the company has, is currently making, or now losing. I often use the balance sheet and the income statement to get a quick yet powerful idea on how the company is currently operating. The balance sheet shows the assets (cash, inventory, building) and liabilities (to be paid; debt). The income statement shows the sales, cost of sales, expenses, and net income/loss. Because these are documents made by accountants, it helps to know a little about accounting. It might be incredibly useful to take an accounting class or even just by a book on accounting. There’s a lot of great information here that’s waiting to be found. Also, the numbers with a () are actually negative numbers. Writing (900) is essentially writing -900. The rest of the document goes into more detail about the financials, so I recommend reading through it when possible. It can actually provide great insight as to how the company operates. 

              Going back to NASDAQ and OTCMarkets main pages for these stocks, you should see a company profile tab. This will tell you the market value of the company, the number of authorized shares the company was given by the SEC, the number of outstanding shares that were given to the public, and the float (the number of shares that can be traded). You can also see the number of shareholders on record as well as the names of large businesses that own the stock. These sites give you a lot of information, and I implore you to use them to their fullest. They’re great resources for any investor and will help you both learn about the stock market as well as find stocks that’ll make you money.

Next:  Fundamental and Technical Analysis
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What Makes The PPS (Price Per Share) Change?

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            Understanding why the price per share changes while trading is fundamental to understanding how to invest. The price per share can change for many different reasons. The rules of supply and demand might have more of a hand in it at times. Maybe there was major news that just broke about the company. Also, human psychology might have an equally important hand to play as well. Investors have to look at all aspects revolving the company to make the most educated decision possible in regards to how the stock price will move. 

              First, I want to focus on the rule of supply and demand. The idea of supply and demand has a huge part to play in the stock market. The first thing that I want you as an investor to be wary of is the idea of dilution. Dilution is when a company is selling the shares that it holds to make more money. This can be a two edged sword for the company in that it’s nice that they’re getting more money, but they’re also losing a proportionate amount of power to the open market. Investors feel a similar two edged sword. It’s nice the company will have funds that it can use to grow, but the shares that you hold will now be cheaper. This makes your shares easier to come by thus making the price of your shares worth less. If you come across a company diluting their shares, it’s worth keeping an eye on. I wouldn’t say it’s quite a red flag, but it’s not an ideal situation for investors. 

              The second thing that I talked about was the importance of keeping an eye on the news. News tends to give people either a sense of either encouragement or discouragement. If the company says that it’s just released a new product line and they’re raking in all the money, then people will be quick to jump on it. With a lot of people now running to buy up all the stock they can, people are now willing to buy a lot of stock and for a higher price. This ends up bringing up the price (I’ll describe this in greater detail later). When news comes out, and people start to hype over the company, it has the ability to cause the pps to claim very fast. This leaves the early birds a chance to flip for the best return on investment. 

              The opposite form of news is also just as important. Let’s say news comes out saying that the same company is being sued. Then some people might start to see the company as fraudulent and a bad investment. If the news is terrible, then people might start to panic and run towards the exit door. Now we have a situation where everyone’s trying to sell, and few (if any) are working to buy. From here, we’ll see the people trying to see for less and less money until they’ve fully exited the stock. My suggestion during something like this would be to keep an eye on the news. If you can be the first to buy in on good news, then you’ll put yourself in a good position to make a lot of money. If you receive bad news and sense a panic coming, you can be the first to leave thus potentially saving your investment.

              Finally, I’m someone that believes that human psychology has a lot of play in trading. I feel that if an investor sees a lot of other people talking positively about a stock, that investor might be more likely to buy into the stock. I also believe that the reverse is true. If an investor goes onto the companies’ forum and sees a lot of people talking about the company in a negative light, then that investor will be less likely to buy into it (or possibly even sell). While I do think this is true, we as investors need to be sure to look at everything with skeptical eyes. There are people out there that will trash talk the company just to get you to sell your shares and put themselves in a better position. These people are fear mongers, and the best way to deal with them is to simply ignore them (or report them). 

              I also want to teach you about a type of scam called a pump and dump. The pump and dump scam starts when the owners of the company give themselves a massive amount of shares. They then release news making it look like business is great when realistically there is no business. Investors see these news articles and all decide to rush in and by the available shares on the market thus inflating the price (the pump). When the price gets really high, the owners sell all their shares at the highest price. Because these people own so many shares, this causes the stock price to plummet and causes their investors to run for the exit. Most of the investors will likely leave with pennies on the dollar after this scam. This is very illegal, and the SEC is working to make sure these kinds of scams don’t happen. Even with this being said though, I encourage you to keep an eye out for such a scam. Businesses have reported their financials quarterly (every three months), but that doesn’t always mean that all of them are truthful. To leave on a good note though, there are plenty of worthwhile businesses that will help you get the most out of your investment. 

Next: Tools for Finding/Investigating Stocks
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Corporations and Stock

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           Now that you’re set up to start trading on your own, let’s get down to business. Before you can start trading effectively, you’ll need to learn the jargon used by many investors. You’ll have to find out how to calculate how much stock you can buy with your finite amount of money. I’ll also teach you how to find a good stock that shows potential to make you some money.  
A stock is a type of security that indicates that you own a part of a corporation. This stock represents a claim on the corporations’ assets and earnings. An example of this would be that if you own 25% of the stock in the corporation, then you’d have a 25% vote in company decisions (you own 25% of the company). Also, the stock is often times referred to as a share in the company.
With all of this being said, a logical question from here would be, “How do these corporations benefit from using stock?” First off, we can separate corporations into two general groups, public and private. To best describe how we can think of both of these entities, let imagine that you were the CEO of this business. Your business is currently a private company meaning that the profits of the company can be separated accordingly between the company’s owners. Now let’s say that your business wants to expand and would benefit from additional funding from investors.
An option for the company is to go to the SEC or the Securities and Exchange Commission and start what’s called an IPO (or Initial Public Offering). The SEC will look through the companies’ financials and decide on how many shares the company will have as well as the starting price for the company when it goes public. When the company goes public, people in the stock market could then buy and trade stock of the company.
Now here is where the company makes their money from investors. When the IPO starts, the company is the one that owns all of the shares. Some processes occur here that are somewhat complicated (I urge you to do some research on this topic), but mainly the company can sell “x” amount of shares at that price (or whatever the price becomes in the process). This is one of the many strategies investors use to make money in the stock market.
Here’s where I can start throwing some jargon your way. Let’s say the SEC decides to give the company 1 million shares. The number of “Outstanding Shares” is 1 million. If the company decides to give out 25% or 250,000 shares, then we would say the float is 250,000 shares. Also, the current price of the stock is called the price per share (abbreviated pps). The reason why all this is important is that as investors, a change to the number of shares available to the public (the float) can dictate the price per share (dictated pps).
Let’s say that you have 1 share in the company and that share get progressively rarer as time goes on, your 1 share will likely go up in price. Alternatively, if that 1 share gets more frequent and common in the marketplace, the price will go down. The reason the price of the share will increase or decrease can be affected by the concept of price and demand. If demand is high and the shares get bought up, the price will grow. If the demand is weak or is the company keeps adding shares to the float (the public market), then the price will go down.

Next: What Makes the PPS (Price Per Share) change? 
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Taxes - How To Plan Ahead

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 When you actually make money from the stock market, the money that you make will be taxable. There are too ways this overall profit will be taxed depending on how long you held onto the stock. If you held onto it for less than a year, then you’ll get taxed more than if you held onto it longer than a year. You can think of it as a bonus (or a tax cut) if you can hold onto the stock for longer than a year. When it comes down to how much you’ll be taxed on your gains, it depends on a lot of things.

First off, you'll need to find out what level of tax bracket you're in. If you're in a higher tax bracket, you will likely have to pay more in taxes than you would otherwise. Also, depending on how long you've held the stock before actually selling it, you might end up having to pay the capital gains tax instead of your standard tax rate. This is important because you'd have to pay more through the capital gains tax. 

I’m not a tax professional. I urge you to do some research in regards to this on your own. From what I can tell, you pay depending on where you are in their tax bracket (the amount you spend on taxes is dependent on how much you made for the year) as well as where you live. There are sites out there that should be able to help you further in estimating how much you’ll have to pay. In my experience, I suggest always keeping at least 1/3 or more of your profits on you during tax time. This way, you’ll be able to play it safe.
              Lastly, there’s an awesome rule out there that says that if for the year you lost money, then the next year you made money, the money that you lost will act as a tax write off. The money that was yours that you invested isn’t taxable (because you didn’t make it). Also, (to my knowledge) you can write off how much you paid in commissions as if it was a loss. When it comes to tax time, TDAmeritrade sent me a sheet with all my earnings on it. From here, it’s just a matter of inputting those numbers into your tax forms, and you’re done. 


Knowing how much you will have to save from your profits is very important because you don't want the IRS to come asking for more money than you have. Just like owning a business, taxes aren't automatically taken out for you. Instead, you have to manually take that money out and put it in the back. If you can figure out how much in taxes you owe before hand, you'll save yourself from a very nasty headache down the way. A very conservative number is to put 1/3 of your profits into a separate bank account.

Next: Corporations and Stock 
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How To Use This Material

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              With all of the above being said, there are some things that I feel need to be said about the following material. First off, all of the strategies and techniques that I’ve come upon are my own. I can build upon these things through observations in the markets as well as lots and lots of reading. I ask that you as the reader take these observations and build upon them. I personally am always looking to improve my skills to an ever more professional level. If anything, let’s all learn and succeed together.
              Second, I’m not responsible for any of the trades that you make. I want you to understand that I only offer my observations to help you make the best trades possible. You ultimately are the one that has to pull the trigger when buying stock. I’m not the person that sent out the buy order.
Third, I’m I don’t have any desire to advertise the stocks that I have positions in. I’m not here to try to prop up my own company with more people flooding into it. Therefore, throughout the course of this text, I’ll be avoiding the use of ticker symbols (names of stocks). I’ll teach you how to analyze a stock to make the best trade possible, but not tell you to make a trade.
Finally, don’t expect to start making insane money overnight. I’ve taught a few of my friends how to invest, and they all started out with their own learning curves. You, me, and everyone else that’s ever started investing have
had to go through this period. Starting out, we won’t really know much about the market and are very prone to making some poor decisions. Therefore, I hope to help you steer clear of these decisions as best as I can. 

Next: Tools for the Trade (Literally) 
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The Four Sources of Income

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Have you ever wanted to live a life where you didn’t have to rely on working to survive? Are you indecisive (and possibly scared) of taking a step out of your comfort zone to pursue a new source of income? If so, this book will be for you. In the past, people could live comfortable lives simply having one job for most of their life. In today’s world, it’s much more challenging. A large percentage of the population live check to check and struggle to live fulfilling lives. Both promotions and high paying jobs simply aren’t available to a lot of people. Plus, the requirements for a lot of these jobs can be astronomical at times. 

Many people today are finding that they need to seek new sources of income. In fact, a quick search on the internet will yield many people criticizing the current job market. Many offer tips to help make a quick buck, but very few are able to give any good suggestions. Selling unused books and creating small knick knacks (that steam from people hobbies) will only get people so far. If people want to find a source of income more sustainable, they’ll need something else. 

In my opinion, there are four general categories that people can make decent (and somewhat sustainable money from). The first category is simply having a job. Having a job is the safest way to make money. Plus, you also know how much you’ll be making per hour. Even though having a job provides these securities, it lacks others. Many companies factor in the supplies you’ll need to do your job and the quality of your work well before hiring you. Also, many companies today are paying people very little but are pushing them to do a lot of work. In my career up to this point, I’ve heard and seen it for myself (as I’m sure some of you have too). It really isn’t a stretch to say that employees are only getting compensated in scraps for their hard work. 

The second alternative is investing (The main topic of this book). When I was a kid, I was taught that my uncle didn’t do well in the markets and lost a lot of money. This caused me to have a stigma growing up that I should stay away from investing as it’s pretty much gambling. I can tell you know though that investing is not gambling. Investing allows you to look at all the facts before hand (whereas in gambling, the information is insufficient). This will allow you to make great trades that will allow you to profit. I’ll go more into the techniques as to how to make the best trades possible later.

To close out my small story with my uncle, he decided to be misinformed about the business he was invested in (pre-computers), and his company went out of business. This is, of course, a possible reality for an investor, but I assure you that because we live in an age of computers, getting caught in the rain like that would simply be your entire fault. You see, back in the day, people made trades that they held for years. They would only check their stocks every week (or maybe every day) in the newspapers. The point that I’m trying to make is, we live in a digital age where trading in the stock market is simply best done with a computer.

Unlike my uncle, people rely on computers to make many of these trades. All of their trades happen in moments, and it’s not uncommon to have computers making all the choices for investors (with little oversight). With all of this going on at one time, it is actually challenging for any new investors to get a good foothold in the market. I have techniques and strategies that I plan to teach all that read this book.

The third form of income is self-employment. This is where I would put the people that are able to sell their hobby for decent money. For example, this is my first time writing a book. If I manage to make some money on it, it will be a third source of income for me. Any YouTube videos, blogs, and other hobbies that are self-sustainable also fall into this category. Is there a service that you can give to the world, but not in the scope of a full business? Then you might look into being self-employed.

The fourth and final form of income would be opening up your business. The difference between this and self-employment is that for self-employment, I generally think of it as being you working at home. In the sense of business, you might own a pestle and mortar shop and have employees working with/for you. While there’s a lot that goes into owning a business, it’s been showing that it can be a very profitable business venture at times. 

In my own personal experience, I’ve looked into all four of these possible sources of income. I personally don’t like working under a boss (though I’ll do it if I have to). I personally enjoy being self-employed as it allows me to be my own boss. I can work at home when I’m bored and benefit financially from it. I also own my own computer repair business (though it is pretty young). But all of these things pale in comparison to the success that I’ve had with investing. I started with about $300 back then and now have about $15,000 in the market.

Next: How to use this material 
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Introduction To The Blog!

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Hello and thanks for joining me on my new blog! My name is Richard Musgrave, and I live in Montana. I have a deep passion for computer science and investing and have had great success at both. Hence, I’m here to share my wisdom with the world. I started with about $300 in the stock market, and I now have about $15,000 (As of 8/18/2016) currently invested at the date of this being posted. Considering this is someone that is working to pay off his student loans (meaning that I have little money to spare), I couldn’t be happier with where I am now.

If you’re looking at this post, then I congratulate you for taking the first step and looking into how to start investing! When I was a kid, I was taught that my uncle didn’t do well in the markets and lost a lot of money. This caused me to have a stigma growing up that I should stay away from investing as it’s pretty much gambling. I can tell you know though that investing is not gambling. Investing allows you to look at all the facts before hand (whereas in gambling, the information is insufficient). This will allow you to make great trades that will allow you to profit. I’ll go more into the techniques as to how to make the best trades possible later. 

To close out my small story with my uncle, he decided to be misinformed about the business he was invested in (pre-computers), and his company went out of business. This is, of course, a possible reality for an investor, but I assure you that because we live in an age of computers, getting caught in the rain like that would simply be your entire fault. You see, back in the day, people made trades that they held for years. They would only check their stocks every week (or maybe even day) in the newspapers. The point that I’m trying to make is, we live in a digital age where trading in the stock market is simply best done with a computer. 

Unlike my uncle, people rely on computers to make many of these trades. All of their trades happen in moments, and it’s not uncommon to have computers making all the choices for investors (with little oversight). With all of this going on at one time, it is actually challenging for any new investors to get a good foothold in the market. I have techniques and strategies that I plan to teach all that come to this page.

With this being said though, there are some things that need to be said.

First off, all of the strategies and techniques that I’ve come upon are my own. I came upon this stuff through observations in the markets as well as plenty of reading. I ask that you take these things and build upon them. I’m steadily building upon what I know as well to improve my skills to an even more professional level. If anything, let’s all learn and succeed together. 

Second, I’m not responsible for any trades that you make. I want you to understand that I only offer my observations to help you make the best trades possible. You ultimately are the one that has to pull the trigger when buying stock. I’m not the person that sent out the buy order.
Third, I don’t have any desire to advertise the stocks that I have positions in. I’m not here to try to prop up my company with more people flooding into it. I will have a disclosure at the end describing my position (or my lack there of). 

“My thoughts on this company are purely my own. I ask that you, as an investor, make your own decisions when purchasing stock. I only wish to offer you tools that give you the best chance of success.”

With that being said then, I feel that there’s the elephant in the room. I’m only invested into one company at the moment. The ticker symbol is RXMD. I ask that you don’t buy into this stock simply because it’s what I have. I might not yield you any money at the end of your trade cycle. Simply, please use common sense. Phew! It feels good to get that off my chest!

Finally, don’t expect to start making crazy money overnight. I’ve taught a few of my friends how to invest, and they all started out with learning curves. You, me, and everyone else that has ever started to invest has had to go through this period. We won’t really know that much about the market and are very prone to making some bad decisions. In my future posts, I’ll give you tips that’ll hopefully detour you from making these poor decisions.


P.S. Due to the fact that this is my first post, It’s only fair to the people coming to this blog to let them know what to expect (frequency, material, etc.). I’m not really a person that waits until it “comes to me.” Honestly, I often write in bursts. I’ll also be posting quite frequently every day. Naturally, I want to make sure you, the reader, have all the tools you need to march toward your own success story!

Be sure to follow this blog as I continue to post new content for you all.

*All Pictures Used Are Open Source
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